Pt100 Thermometers

The operating principle of resistance thermometers is based on the increase of electric resistance of metal conductors (RTD: Resistance Temperature Detectors) with temperature.

This physical phenomenon was discovered by Sir Humphry Davy in 1821.In 1871, Sir William Siemens described the application of this property using platinum, thereby introducing an innovation in the manufacturing of temperature sensors. Platinum resistance thermometers have been used as an international standard for measuring temperatures between hydrogen triple point at 13.81 K and the freezing point of antimony at 630.75°C (1167.26°F).

Among the various metals to be used in the construction of resistance thermometers, platinum (Pt), a noble metal, is the one that can measure temperatures throughout a wide range; from -251°C (-419.8°F) to 899°C (1650.2°F), with a linear behavior.

Platinum RTD thermometers were common in the seventies but have now been replaced with thermistor sensors because of their smaller dimensions and faster response to temperature changes. The most common RTD sensor using platinum is the Pt100, which means a resistance of 100? at 0°C with a temperature coefficient of 0.00385? per degree Celsius. For a higher price one can buy platinum sensors with 250, 500 or 1000? (Pt1000).

The main disadvantage of RTD probes is the resistance of the connection cable. This resistance prevents the use of standard two-wire cables for lengths over a few meters, since it affects the accuracy of the reading. For this reason, to obtain high levels of accuracy in industrial and laboratory applications, the use of a three or four-wire system is recommended.

For all its Pt100 thermometers and probes, Hanna has chosen the multiple-wire technology for higher accuracy.

Pt100 Thermometers The operating principle of resistance thermometers is based on the increase of electric resistance of metal conductors (RTD: Resistance Temperature Detectors) with... read more »
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Pt100 Thermometers

The operating principle of resistance thermometers is based on the increase of electric resistance of metal conductors (RTD: Resistance Temperature Detectors) with temperature.

This physical phenomenon was discovered by Sir Humphry Davy in 1821.In 1871, Sir William Siemens described the application of this property using platinum, thereby introducing an innovation in the manufacturing of temperature sensors. Platinum resistance thermometers have been used as an international standard for measuring temperatures between hydrogen triple point at 13.81 K and the freezing point of antimony at 630.75°C (1167.26°F).

Among the various metals to be used in the construction of resistance thermometers, platinum (Pt), a noble metal, is the one that can measure temperatures throughout a wide range; from -251°C (-419.8°F) to 899°C (1650.2°F), with a linear behavior.

Platinum RTD thermometers were common in the seventies but have now been replaced with thermistor sensors because of their smaller dimensions and faster response to temperature changes. The most common RTD sensor using platinum is the Pt100, which means a resistance of 100? at 0°C with a temperature coefficient of 0.00385? per degree Celsius. For a higher price one can buy platinum sensors with 250, 500 or 1000? (Pt1000).

The main disadvantage of RTD probes is the resistance of the connection cable. This resistance prevents the use of standard two-wire cables for lengths over a few meters, since it affects the accuracy of the reading. For this reason, to obtain high levels of accuracy in industrial and laboratory applications, the use of a three or four-wire system is recommended.

For all its Pt100 thermometers and probes, Hanna has chosen the multiple-wire technology for higher accuracy.

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